Archive | scriptwriting RSS for this section

YOU DON’T NEED LUCK TO BE A SUCCESSFUL SCREENWRITER…

Hello everyone!  This time of year is all about 4-leaf clover luck and tradition – people wearing green and throwing parties. You may find yourself getting pinched if you don’t wear your green!

March is also known for “March Madness,” the college basketball tournament. Do you have a favorite team? At the Story Solution website and Facebook Page we’re always on your team, offering tips and instructional videos and free sample script analyses to help cheer you on toward screenwriting success with the proven Hero Goal Sequences method of creating dynamic stories and exciting, character-driven screenplays.

(And just let me mention… to simplify things, I use one word, “Hero,” to mean any man, woman, child, animated flower, one-eyed one-horn flying purple people eater – or any other character who has the lead role in any story.)

Truth is, I have analyzed hundreds of films and taught hundreds of screenwriting graduate students how to identify the story sequences and elements of character needed to write award-winning scripts. And I put it all in my book, The Story Solution, which outlines the 23 Actions All Heroes Must Take to keep audiences captivated.

What makes The Story Solution stand out from the rest? Most books on screenwriting – and there are many good ones – offer advice or story-building systems based on abstract ideas. It’s frequently overlooked out there that successful visual storytelling requires you to master one overriding physical, practical concept: CHANGE. Change must flow in constant visual MOTION to drive a story forward – the same way a shark must keep moving to stay alive. And the amount of change required in any feature film story can actually be physically measured.

I have discovered that there’s a universal number of “change units” required for audiences to be drawn into any film story and really feel it.  Each of these specifically timed short sequences contain common plot developing events. Not just the this-is-where-the-hero-beats-up-all-the-bad-guys kind of advice, but a series of actions in a specific order, appearing at predictable moments in a story.

And here’s how I know I’m right.  There once lived a playwright named Sophocles who wrote a smash hit play called “Oedipus Rex”… about 2500 years ago. I took a very close look at that play (and hundreds of others) and found that the storytelling is physically structured exactly like all major hit movies are today. The human mind has ALWAYS processed and enjoyed stories in the same way. It’s how our brains are built. It’s physically how we absorb – and feel – a story.

So if you master these specific steps of change, every screenplay you write with them will have the potential to become a winner with audiences.

Hey, it may sound to you like I’m full of hot air, and well, okay, at times there might be some truth to that idea. But in this case, I’M NOT WRONG about the power of Hero Goal Sequences.

As a tenured full-professor at California State University, Northridge, I have proven it to my graduate students many hundreds of times over. Every semester, I turn Hero Goal Sequence doubters into Hero Goal Sequence believers.

But some of you may still be thinking this all sounds way too clinical and soulless. Just 23 predictable sequences? Heck no! Where’s the creativity in 23 pieces of anything?!  What about ART?

Well, may I point out that there are only 26 letters in the English language? Just 26. And people have been creating great literature with those same 26 letters for centuries.  There are only 12 keys on a piano, and those same 12 keys are merely repeated on the keyboard at an ever higher octave pitch to constitute a piano. During the last few centuries, has “the problem” of only having 12 repeating keys ever limited creativity in music?

In The Story Solution you will learn:

  • The Secrets of Story Structure. How to put together your story the way professional screenwriters do. Instead of floundering and suffering over “oh what will my hero do next???” you will KNOW what they need to do next. By identifying the 23 Actions All Heroes Must Take, building your story will become a clear and specifically coached process for creating every two to seven page sequence in your script – and you’ll be constructing the right actions in your story to shape full, memorable heroes and heroines that audiences will love to follow.

  • How to Create Dynamic Characters. Having an engaging story is essential. But what’s a story without vivid characters bringing it to life? Learn to write dynamic characters that hook your viewers and make them burn to know what those characters will do next.

  • Rewriting skills. learn how to shape and test every scene and sequence to make sure they all move your story and characters forward to a fulfilling climax. The Story Solution is filled with tips and methods to make your rewriting process far less painful and much more rewarding.

Other key tools revealed:

  • How to write Powerful Dialogue

  • How to choose the best Character Categories to use in your story

  • How to Spot and Fix Story Problems before they become baked in

  • The secret to writing Powerful Character Growth.

And oh so much more.

BY THE WAY – The Story Solution HAS ONCE AGAIN HIT #1 BEST SELLER IN THREE BOOK CATEGORIES on CHINA AMAZON: Film and TV – Animation – Graphic Novels

So deeply pleased and excited. Thanks, China!

All Very Best Wishes,


About The Story Solution: Eric Edson’s The Story Solution provides screenwriting tips for those interested in screenplay writing. Seen as one of the best books on screenwriting and currently #1 in its category on China Amazon, Edson outlines 23 actions used to create three dimensional heroes. Visit the website at  http://www.thestorysolution.com to learn about writing a movie script. “Like” the Facebook page to receive tips on scriptwriting. Call (818) 677-7808 for information about writing a movie script.

Eric Edson Highlights 5 Romantic Comedy Screenwriters

 

romantic screenwriting

“Before launching into your next romantic screenwriting project, learn a few tips from the masters of the genre…”

Through his book The Story Solution and his online screenwriting blogs, Eric Edson recommends studying the scripts and professional growth of screenwriters who have already achieved box office success.  By learning about the career journeys of those who have already sold screenplays, today’s up-and-coming authors can better prepare themselves to earn tomorrow’s screen credits.

To help writers gain an understanding of screenwriting development in the romance and romantic comedy movie genres, Eric Edson has reviewed here the experiences of several romantic movie screenwriters.  The selections were based on movie box office success, novelty of approach, and how each script was turned into a winner.  Studying the journeys of these romantic movie screenwriters can serve as a foundation of knowledge for what to expect when developing other movie genres as well.

After much consideration, Eric Edson recommends the following romantic movie screenwriters as exemplars of effective screenwriting techniques: Mark Andrus & James L. Brooks, Nancy Meyers, Kevin Wade, Marc Lawrence, Katie Ford & Caryn Lucas and Pete Chiarelli.  If you are seeking knowledge that will help you sell a screenplay, consider studying these romantic movie screenwriters and their work.

Mark Andrus & James L. Brooks – “As Good As It Gets” – Romantic Movie Screenwriters

romantic screenwriting scriptwritersTake Jack Nicholson as an obsessive-compulsive novelist, Helen Hunt as the waitress mother of an asthmatic son, and Greg Kinnear as a gay-bashed artist, add superb screenwriting sensitivity, and you’ve got the recipe for box office and Academy Award success in 1997’s “As Good As It Gets.” Mark Andrus had his MBA when he took a creative writing class while waiting to hear from law schools. His then enrolled in a Master of Professional Writing Program. Early in his career, Andrus wrote “Old Friends,” a screenplay about the vilest man in New York City and his gay neighbor. After a lot of meetings the project fell into limbo until James L. Brooks became involved and the two collaborated on a rewrite that turned into box office gold.  LESSON: The one personal quality that all successful screenwriters share is relentlessness.  Never stop.  And never stop rewriting.

Nancy Meyers – “It’s Complicated” – Romantic Movie Screenwriter

romantic screenwriting scriptwriters Nancy MeyersWhat could be more complicated than a divorced Meryl Streep and a since-remarried Alec Baldwin reigniting the spark at their son’s graduation? How about adding Steve Martin as the dependable but non earth-shaker as her new love interest? Screenwriter Nancy Meyers makes it all seem quite easy to understand in “It’s Complicated.” After an early interest in acting, Meyers decided to pursue screenwriting after she saw “The Graduate.” She graduated from American University in Washington, D.C. with a degree in journalism and spent a year working in public television. After moving to Hollywood, she took film-making classes where she connected with directors such as Martin Scorsese. Elements of her own life crept into this film such as a brief stint as the owner of a small cheesecake business and components of her own divorce story.  LESSON: Mine your own life experiences for story elements, yes, but don’t write an autobiography.  Our real lives are mostly boring.  Write the unusual in terms of what you know.

Kevin Wade – “Working Girl” – Romantic Movie Screenwriter

romantic screenwriting scriptwriters Kevin WadeRemember Harrison Ford before Indiana Jones? He was almost outshone by Melanie Griffith and Sigourney Weaver in Kevin Wade’s 1988 debut as a screenwriter with “Working Girl.” The film features a notable opening sequence following Manhattan-bound commuters on the Staten Island Ferry accompanied by Carly Simon’s song “Let the River Run.” Wade says the idea for the script came to him in Manhattan’s Battery Park one morning in 1984 as he wondered about today’s immigrant story. He decided to represent his heroine as “an immigrant every day.” To make sure his script sounded realistic, Wade spent months interviewing Wall Street workers.  LESSON:  Keep your story accessible to the widest possible audience, and keep it feeling real through careful research.

Marc Lawrence, Katie Ford & Caryn Lucas – “Miss Congeniality” – Romantic Movie Screenwriters

romantic screenwriting scriptwritersTo help Sandra Bullock combine her onscreen charm and lovable physicality, this trio of writers penned 2000’s “Miss Congeniality.” Lawrence graduated from Binghamton University with a degree in English and later worked on NBC’s Family Ties. Ford had started as a stand-up comedian before she went on to write and produce some television series and films. Lucas gained writing credits working on “The Nanny” before combining her skills with Lawrence and Ford for the perfect movie script.  LESSON:  Be open to working closely with other writers.  Don’t let any over-sized ego or defensiveness about working with others stop your pursuit of the best possible script.

Pete Chiarelli – “The Proposal” – Romantic Movie Screenwriters

romantic screenwriting scriptwritersPeter Chiarelli came out of the University of Washington with a BA in Communications and Economics.  2009’s “The Proposal” was only the second screenplay he’d ever written, but he wanted it judged on its own merits.  He originally put the name “Jennifer Kirby” on the front page.  Eventually the truth came out, and the picture has grossed more than $314 million worldwide since then.  LESSON:  Sometimes a selling ploy, like the use of a pseudonym, can keep buyer focus where you want it most – on the work itself.

Eric Edson’s commitment to excellence includes providing aspiring screenwriters with a professional’s knowledge of the screenwriting industry.  We hope this information helps you learn about the screenwriting process.

About The Story Solution Book: The Story Solution was written by accomplished screenwriter Eric Edson.  It reveals the 23 actions used in all successful movies to create dynamic, three dimensional heroes and link all parts of a captivating screenplay.  Eric also offers screenwriting tips, screenwriting resources, and screenplay reading recommendations. Visit the website and Facebook page or call 818-677-3192 for more information.  Eric Edson’s book, The Story Solution: 23 Actions All Great Heroes Must Take, is an insider’s guide to scriptwriting success and TV writing tips.  Aspiring movie writers who are searching for screenwriting books will learn the 23 actions used to create dynamic characters and link all parts of a screenplay from first page to last.

Eric Edson Highlights 5 Romantic Comedy Screenwriters

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Eric Edson Highlights 5 Romantic Comedy Screenwriters

 So that screenwriters get a better understanding of the screenplay growth and development process in the romantic comedy movie genre, this month on his blog Eric Edson looks at how several romantic comedy screenwriters arrived on the A-list.   Author and screenwriter Edson seeks to help those who follow the screenwriting course outlined his book to gain an understanding of how scripts are developed before finally reaching a world-wide audience.

Before launching into your next romantic screenwriting project, learn a few development tips from masters of the genre.  Screenwriter and university professor Eric Edson advises those hoping to write for the silver screen to collect many screenwriting tips along the way by studying the scripts and careers of successful screenwriters.

“The old adage is that sex sells.  But the truth remains that our eternal search for connection and loving romance sells much better,” said Eric Edson

The selections were based on film box office success, novelty of approach, and how the script was refined over time to engage an audience.  Studying these romantic movie screenwriters can serve as a foundation of knowledge for writing all other movie genres as well.

After thorough consideration, Eric Edson recommends the following romantic movie screenwriters as exemplars of effective screenwriting techniques: Mark Andrus & James L. Brooks, Nancy Meyers, Kevin Wade, Marc Lawrence, Katie Ford & Caryn Lucas and Pete Chiarelli. If you are seeking knowledge that will help you sell a screenplay, consider studying these romantic movie screenwriting greats.

Through The Story Solution, his online screenwriting blogs, and a recommended study of screenwriters who have achieved box office success, Edson leads followers on a virtual screenwriting course. By learning about the background of those who were able to sell screenplays, today’s up-and-coming authors can earn tomorrow’s screen credits.

About The Story Solution Book:  The Story Solution was written by accomplished screenwriter Eric Edson.  It reveals the 23 actions used to create dynamic, three dimensional heroes and link all parts of a captivating screenplay.  He also covers screenwriting tips, screenwriting resources, and screenplay reading recommendations. Follow Eric on his Facebook page or call 818-677-3192 for more information.

5 Twitter Accounts Scriptwriters Should Follow

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Eric Edson Highlights 5 Romantic Comedy Screenwriters

 In an effort to ensure up-and-coming screenwriters are aware of the best screenwriting resources online, Eric Edson reviewed several Twitter accounts that can provide excellent information. The author and screenwriter wanted to make sure that those who follow the screenwriting tips outlined in his book have an understanding of how the business of selling a movie script works.

Twitter can provide a valuable source of information to sell a screenplay. Following an insider’s Twitter account can lead to useful tips on agents, deals, and movie results.  Once a creative screenwriting project is fully developed, script writers may benefit by following tweets from well known screenwriters when trying to sell a screenplay.

The final selections were chosen based on reputation of the feed manager, reliability of information, and timeliness of data. Scriptwriters who follow these Twitter accounts will build a good foundation of knowledge about Hollywood and the film business.  The full review can be read online on the Story Solution screenwriting blog.

After thorough consideration, Eric Edson recommends that scriptwriters follow these Twitter accounts: ScriptChat, Bad Script Advice, Writer’s Relief, Box Office Mojo and The Story Solution. If you are seeking knowledge that will help you sell a screenplay, these information outlets will guide you along the way.

“We’re stuck with technology, so we might as well use it to our best advantage. Tools like Twitter are much overlooked. Tweets from well known screenwriters offer truth reduced to 140 characters of wisdom. We hope this review helps our loyal readers connect with valuable screenwriting resources online.” said Eric Edson

Eric Edson’s book, The Story Solution: 23 Actions All Great Heroes Must Take, is a scriptwriting course that outlines the completely new Hero Goal Sequences® method for screenwriters and novelists to create dynamic heroes and powerful stories that get deals. The Story Solution website is a valuable source for information on screenwriting books.

About The Story Solution:  The Story Solution was written by accomplished screenwriter Eric Edson. It reveals the 23 actions used to create dynamic, three dimensional heroes and link all parts of a captivating screenplay together into a seamless storyline. He also covers screenwriting tips and screenwriting books. Visit the website and Facebook page or call 818- 677-3192 for more information or to download a sample from the book.

5 Twitter Accounts Scriptwriters Should Follow

Screenwriting Blog / Screenwriting Resources / Screenwriting Tips

5 Twitter Accounts Scriptwriters Should Follow

“Twitter can provide a valuable source of information to sell a screenplay…”

Following an insider’s Twitter account can lead to useful tips on agents, deals, and movie results.  Once a creative screenwriting project is fully developed, script writers may benefit by following tweets from well known screenwriters when trying to sell a screenplay.

Eric Edson’s book, The Story Solution: 23 Actions All Great Heroes Must Take, is a scriptwriting course that outlines the completely new Hero Goal Sequences® method for screenwriters and novelists to create dynamic heroes and powerful stories that get deals. The Story Solution website is a valuable source for screenwriting tips and information on screenwriting books.

In an effort to ensure up-and-coming screenwriters are aware of the best screenwriting resources online, Eric Edson reviewed several Twitter accounts that can provide excellent information. The author and screenwriter wanted to make sure that those who follow the screenwriting course outlined in his book have an understanding of how the business of selling a movie script works.

The final selections were chosen based on reputation of the feed manager, reliability of information, and timeliness of data. Scriptwriters who follow these Twitter accounts will build a good foundation of knowledge about Hollywood and the film business.

After thorough consideration, Eric Edson recommends that scriptwriters follow these Twitter accounts: ScriptChat, Bad Script Advice, Writer’s Relief, Box Office Mojo and The Story Solution. If you are seeking knowledge that will help you sell a screenplay, these information outlets will guide you along the way.

ScriptChat (@scriptchat) is the best resource for live Twitter interviews, where filmmakers and other industry insiders will answer your burning questions. Screenwriters and filmmakers meet to talk craft, host guests and panels, and share ideas on Sundays at 8pm EST and 8pm GMT in this virtual space. Visit the website and Facebook page for more information.

 

 

Bad Script Advice (@badscrptadvice) offers hilarious scriptwriting advice that is clearly meant to be taken in reverse. With the advisory that, “I write bad scripts, now you can too!” you’ll learn not to begin each scene with a description of the quality, feel, and position of the sun in the room and other insights that will really make your script stand out.

 

 

Writer’s Relief (@WritersRelief) is an author’s submission service that uses its Twitter feed to provide tons of enriching quotes, articles, and other great resources for writers. Visit the website and Facebook page for more information.

 

 

Box Office Mojo (@BoxOfficeMojo) invites screenwriters to “get your fresh box office stats here!” As the number one online destination for box office news and analysis, the box office reporter follows the hallmarks of accuracy, comprehensiveness, and perspective in providing a Twitter feed that engages and informs. Visit the website and Facebook page for more information.

 

 

The Story Solution (@storysolution) Follow Eric Edson’s Twitter feed for tips and resources related to storytelling structure, curing writer’s block and other script writing insights. Edson has written seventeen feature screenplays on assignment for such companies as Sony, Warner Brothers, Disney, 20th Fox, ABC Motion Pictures, and Lifetime and uses this outlet to post motivational tips and reminders.

 

 

 

Twitter is a valuable source of scriptwriting tips and truths reduced to 140 characters.

Eric Edson’s commitment to excellence includes providing aspiring screenwriters with an industry professional’s knowledge of the entire screenwriting industry. Finding Twitter accounts to follow for continual updates on Hollywood happenings can be a challenge for scriptwriters. This review aims to save readers of his screenwriting book, The Story Solution, from the effort of finding Twitter accounts to follow on their own. We hope this information helps you learn about the screenwriting process. 

About The Story Solution:  The Story Solution was written by accomplished screenwriter Eric Edson. It reveals the 23 actions used to create dynamic, three dimensional heroes and link all parts of a captivating screenplay together into a seamless storyline. He also covers screenwriting tips,screenwriting resources, and screenwriting booksVisit the website and Facebook page or call 818- 677-3192 for more information or to download a sample from the book.